Our Stylish Weekend Getaway | Springtime in Washington, DC

Our Stylish Weekend Getaway | Springtime in Washington, DC

You can daydream about seeing the spring cherry blossoms in Washington, DC – but there’s nothing quite like seeing them in person.

Washington, DC, is a remarkable place to visit any time of year. Springtime in America’s capital, however, is particularly gorgeous. Pops of white and pink dot the landscape of Washington in March and early April, adding a sense of renewal and wonder to the landscape.

Springtime in Washington, DC; cherry blossoms in America's capital.
Springtime in Washington, DC; cherry blossoms in America’s capital.

Peak bloom time for cherry blossoms in the Washington, DC, area is generally late March into the first week of April. Tracy and Peter Salerno (of Peter Salerno Inc.) chose the first weekend in April 2019 to enjoy the occasion, and the resulting photos of the cherry blossoms, U.S. Capitol building, and Mount Vernon (among others) are just a taste of the beauty the Salernos experienced.

Cherry blossom season in Washington, DC, has become a bona fide event in the city, with the annual Cherry Blossom Festival drawing 1.5 million visitors over a 4 week span. There’s even an official Cherry Blossom Watch online for you to check the bloom season, upload and share cherry blossom photos, and plan your spring trip to Washington, DC.

A gorgeous view of cherry blossoms along the Potomac River in spring.
A gorgeous view of cherry blossoms along the Potomac River in spring.

The tradition of cherry blossoms in Washington, DC, dates back to 1912 and a partnership between Japan and the United States. The first cherry trees were planted on March 27, 1912, in West Potomac Park. The first official Cherry Blossom Festival was held in 1934, and the tradition has (quite literally) blossomed into the most beautiful annual spring event in the United States.

Whether it’s the mythical story of George Washington chopping down the cherry tree, the trees’ symbolism of America’s relationship with Japan, or simply the beauty of white and pink blossoms dotting America’s capital, the draw of the National Cherry Blossom Festival cannot be overstated.

Cherry blossoms in front of the Washington Monument.
Cherry blossoms in front of the Washington Monument.

Tracy and Peter Salerno’s visit to Washington, DC, featured a sunrise cherry blossom photography session around the U.S. Capitol, Jefferson Memorial, Lincoln Memorial and Washington Monument. The Salernos also took a day trip to Mount Vernon, which offered a glance back into American history and gorgeous views of the Potomac River.

Tracy and Peter Salerno at Mount Vernon in spring.
Tracy and Peter Salerno at Mount Vernon in spring.
The bank of the Potomac River at Mount Vernon.
The bank of the Potomac River at Mount Vernon.

If you truly want the prime Washington cherry blossom experience, it’s important to keep track of peak bloom times on an annual basis. While the National Cherry Blossom Festival takes place for 4 weeks, the peak bloom time is a much shorter window. Make sure to consult Cherry Blossom Watch for all the yearly details, and take advantage of an early morning (or two) to get the best photo opportunities of these gorgeous blossoms in the light of sunrise.

We promise you will leave Washington, DC, feeling inspired and fresh – and ready to create vivid design masterpieces of your very own. 

Tracy and Peter Salerno in Washington, DC, during the National Cherry Blossom Festival.
Tracy and Peter Salerno in Washington, DC, during the National Cherry Blossom Festival.

Memorial Day Tributes: This Year, Say More Than ‘Thank You’.

Why ‘Thank You’ Is Just the Beginning on Memorial Day

Thank you for your service. It’s a phrase that has become almost synonymous with Memorial Day (and to some extent, Veteran’s Day) in America. From billboards to TV ads, graphic design to greeting cards, these 5 words are the catch-all catchphrase that stands for a debt of gratitude that American citizens cannot possibly repay.

And so, with so much to be grateful for in a free country, it might be time to ask ourselves: “Shouldn’t we try to say just a bit more?”

This Memorial Day, say more than "Thank you for your service". (Credit: Peter Salerno Inc.)
This Memorial Day, say more than “Thank you for your service”. (Credit: Peter Salerno Inc.)

This line of thinking actually started a year ago, when we met with Peter Salerno, owner of our parent company Peter Salerno Inc. and a veteran of the United States Navy. On our way out of the meeting leading up to Memorial Day, we turned at the door and stated, “Hey – thank you for your service.”

Peter smiled, of course, and nodded his head in a “you’re welcome”. Later that day, we realized that while we meant what we said, Peter was probably going to hear the same 5 words dozens more times over the next several days, and had for decades before that.

This isn’t to say that veterans aren’t happy to hear “thank you for your service”. At their core, most American military veterans are humble, modest, and shy away from personal praise. They’re not looking for individual recognition or to be ‘singled out’ for their heroism and valor.

Peter Salerno, during his service in the U.S. Navy. Happy Memorial Day!
Peter Salerno, during his service in the U.S. Navy. Happy Memorial Day!

But just because our military heroes don’t ASK for more than a ‘thank you’ doesn’t mean we shouldn’t GIVE it to them.

Think about your own life – what you do, where you’ve been, and what roles you’ve come to occupy in your life. If you’re a teacher, it must be lovely to get your first few “World’s Best Teacher” gifts. As an actor, your first “Break a leg!” is a cool thing to hear. But after countless repetitions of the same well wishes and compliments – whether we mean it or not – those common refrains start to ring a bit hollow and a bit dry.

It doesn’t take much to put a little more effort into your gratitude this Memorial Day! 

If you have a family member, friend, loved one, neighbor or colleague that has served in our nation’s military, take an extra few minutes to find out more about their service, their personal likes and interests. “Design” the military veterans in your life a special show of your thanks – even if it’s as simple as crafting a new way to say “Thank you for your service”.

Take a little time to help a veteran with a project, errand or work around their home. Volunteer to drive an elderly veteran to a Memorial Day Parade or out to lunch. Or do something that’s increasingly rare these days – pick up the phone, send a letter, or make a personal visit.

To the U.S. military veterans and those who gave their lives in service of our country – we know “thank you” isn’t enough to repay you. We also know that you don’t ask for our gratitude, recognition or payment – your sacrifice is selfless. Regardless of why or how you entered the military, the fact remains that you gave of yourselves for the greater good of our country, and you personally protected the freedom and security of families like mine that you will never know or meet.

So this year, we’re choosing not to “thank you for your service”. Because in many ways, we should be thanking you for everything.

Take Peter Salerno’s 2014 Thanksgiving Turkey Donation Challenge!

Take Peter Salerno’s 2014 Thanksgiving Turkey Donation Challenge!

Help Feed the Needy, Share on Social Media – #TurkeyChallenge

SCROLL DOWN FOR INFO ON JOINING THE THANKSGIVING TURKEY DONATION CHALLENGE!

Take Peter Salerno's 2014 Thanksgiving Turkey Donation Challenge!
Take Peter Salerno’s 2014 Thanksgiving Turkey Donation Challenge!

The importance of Thanksgiving can’t be exaggerated. It’s a holiday that focuses on family, togetherness, love and warmth. For one Thursday in November, family, friends and loved ones gather around a table to celebrate and give thanks for what they have, and give thanks for one another.

Not everyone is so lucky. According to the USDA, nearly 20% of American households experienced food insecurity within the last 2 years. That number includes 8.2 million American children. The challenge of providing enough food to eat for everyone in America may seem impossible – but helping those in need eat for one day a year doesn’t have to be.

For Thanksgiving 2014, Peter Salerno and Peter Salerno Inc. invite you, your family and your place of business to participate in the Thanksgiving Turkey Donation Challenge. It’s inexpensive, it’s easy, and you can’t replace the feeling you get knowing you’re giving a family in need a Thanksgiving turkey.

8.2 million American children may have insufficient food this Thanksgiving. (Credit USDA)
8.2 million American children may have insufficient food this Thanksgiving. (Credit USDA)

You may think people are not going hungry in your town. They are. You may think one turkey couldn’t possibly change a family’s life this Thanksgiving. It does.

A turkey costs about $20. We challenge you to go out, buy a turkey, and bring it to your local food pantry or soup kitchen. Trust us – they will be glad to accept it.

How to JOIN the 2014 Thanksgiving Turkey Donation Challenge:

Then, SHARE your participation in the Thanksgiving Turkey Donation Challenge with us! Here’s how:

  1. Buy a Thanksgiving turkey for those in need. (Or buy a few!)
  2. Deliver the turkey(s) to your local food pantry or soup kitchen.
  3. Take a picture of you, your turkey and your delivery.
  4. Post that picture on Twitter or Facebook with the hashtag #TurkeyChallenge.
  5. Follow or mention Peter Salerno Inc. on Twitter and Facebook, and join the conversation!

Here’s the best part: Peter Salerno Inc. will MATCH donations, turkey-for-turkey, up to the first 100 turkeys donated between now and Thanksgiving! All you need to do is post a picture of your turkey donation to Peter Salerno Inc.’s Facebook page with the hashtag #TurkeyChallenge!

Join Peter Salerno and Peter Salerno Inc. in making the 2014 Thanksgiving Turkey Donation Challenge a reality. We encourage you to make it a part of your annual Thanksgiving ritual as well.

Somewhere, someone’s Thanksgiving will mean a lot more because of you.